Stockings: an instagram tutorial

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I posted this mini-tutorial on Instagram and I thought you guys might want to see it here too. If you make any stockings with it, be sure to send me a photo!

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Step 1: supplies

  • stocking template (the one I used for this tutorial is from Diary of a Quilter, but I enlarged it when I made them for my family)
  • 2 quilted panels 9.5 by 16
  • 45 inches of single fold bias binding
  • 2 nine-inch pieces of double fold binding
  • 1 hanging loop (I made mine using a 3 x 6 inch piece of fabric folded multiple times and then stitched closed)

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Step 2: use the template to mark and cut a front and back for your stocking (be sure to reverse the template for the back)

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Step 3: sew the double fold binding to the tops

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Step 4: place the front and back wrong sides together and sew with a 1/4 inch seam

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Step 5: attach the single fold binding, leaving 2-3 extra inches at the top

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Step 6: hand sew the binding down, folding and flipping the extra at the top into the stocking

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Step 7: attach the loop (very securely if you tend to overstuff your stockings like I do) and you’re done!

Quilt for baby

A few weeks ago I made some little stuffed toys for the baby’s room… and then somehow a quilt sprung out of the same fabrics. Spontaneous combustion?

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It was more of a challenge than I initially expected! The pattern came from an older Fons & Porter publication (Fat Quarter Friendly). It suggested needle turn appliquΓ© as an alternative to the curved piecing typically required for a classic winding ways quilt. Sounded good to me since I have needle turn experience but I haven’t tackled curved piecing yet.

Trouble is, the points really need to line up in order to create the “winding ways” effect. After my first block I realized it definitely wasn’t going to happen by luck. After a restless night’s sleep I came up with the idea to piece the background blocks first and then sort of manipulate the appliquΓ© points to approximately come together enough to create the design. It worked! But it was definitely challenging and a little backbreaking. I quickly decided to reduce the overall size of the quilt and add a border! That cut the number of blocks I needed from 20 to 9.

Here it is before quilting.

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I hand quilted around all the appliquΓ© shapes.

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And now I am feeling more ready than ever to have this baby!

Linking up with Crazy Mom for the first time in quite a while. πŸ™‚